Care Tips for Your Spring Cut Flowers

After the winter weather, the warm days and clear skies we had this weekend were a tantalizing hint that the cold will be gone for good soon – at least for the season. Sunnier skies, warmer weather and fun, outdoor activities are on our doorstep! I spot my boots on the shoe rack and long to put them away until next winter. Even though the weather hasn’t quite caught up yet (it’s getting there!) spring is here, and so are the happy colors and delightful scents of spring flowers and bulbs.

So, when you come by and pick up a bunch of these bright beauties,  what do you need to know about them to keep them cheering your home longer?

Daffodils: Daffodils arranged in a vase all by themselves make for a cheery, eye-catching design. If, however, you want to arrange a bouquet with daffodils and other flowers, keep this in mind: daffodils secret a sap when their stem is cut. This does the daffodils no harm, but it will cause other flowers in the arrangement to wilt. So here’s what we do when making mixed arrangement of daffodils and other flowers: we cut the daffodils to the height we want them and put them in a separate vase of water for about an hour to allow the sap to drain. Then – without cutting their stems again – we rinse them and add them to our arrangement.

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Hyacinth: With their bright colors and sweet fragrance, hyacinth are very popular. When bringing hyacinth home for a cut-flower arrangement, don’t cut the woody, bottom part of the stem if you don’t have to. This helps the hyacinth draws up water, and it will last longer this way. If you’re working with hyacinth bulbs it’s a good idea to wear gloves. The bulbs are acidic and can cause skin irritation.

hyacinth        hyacinth 123

Tulips: Did you know that not only do their petals open and close depending on the temperature in a room, but tulips will continue to grow a few more inches after they’re cut? This movement in the design makes for a wild and alluring arrangement.

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Anemones: When arranging with this beautiful, whimsical flower keep in mind that the petals will open in the light and warmth, so while anemones are pretty hardy, despite their delicate look, keeping them in a cool area in your home will help them last longer. Anemones will also continue to grow after they are cut!

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Easter spring bulbs

Easter is very late this year (April 24!) but no so late that great spring bulbs have passed. Oregon has a wonderful spring season with a variety of bulb flowers that look as beautiful on the table as they do in the ground. My favorites include: daffodils, tulips, hyacinth, lilacs

Daffodils:

These bright pops of yellow can be seen as early as February here in Eugene, OR and are a most welcome sign that spring is on its way.  Fresh-cut daffodils release a sap that is harmful to other flowers so arrange them in their own vase.  If you want to include them with other flowers allow them to soak overnight in cool, clean water so that the daffodils have a chance to release some of this substance.

Tulips:

These graceful buds are one of my favorite because they continue to grow after cut! In a single day they can grow the length of their head!! The tulip fields pictured left are almost unreal they are so beautiful.

 

Hyacinth:

For fragrance lovers, hyacinth are a dream come true. Their little bell-like blossoms emit a most wonderful smell and their big, full blossoms fill out a vase nicely.

Ranunculus:

Although every bride wants this flower in their bridal bouquet it is really a spring bloomer. At times they look like mini peonies and at other times they resemble spray roses. Since they are available until May we are using them a lot here in the store as prom rings!